Gloved hands performing a tattoo

Most people have thought of getting a tattoo at one point or another. Some would impulsively act on it and get one right then and there. Others just keep thinking of getting one but never do. Some let that thought build slowly, do their homework and look for everything they need to know about getting a tattoo – from the design to the artist who they think is perfect for them.

 

However, there are some from the last category who forget to look up one important factor that they definitely should know about before heading to a tattoo studio – the actual process of getting inked.

 

For those who are considering getting a tattoo or just curious about what really happens when you get one, read on! Here, we tell you how tattoos are done, from start to finish.

 

So you have chosen a design that you really want, and have already found a good artist. Your artist will set a schedule when you’ll have it done. Before that, expect the artist to ask for your valid identification to prove your age. Your address and phone number would most probably be required, too. In most tattoo studios, you are also expected to pay for the tattoo before the actual session.

 

When all of that is covered, on the day of the session, you’d be seated on a chair similar to a dentist’s chair. It’s most probably going to be in a private room unless it’s okay for you to have others watching.

 

In the prepping stage, your skin where the tattoo would be will be cleaned and shaved if need be. The stencil transfer will be done next. Some artists moisten the skin with water, while others prefer stick deodorant. This will make the design transfer better.

 

Next, the artist will prepare the tattoo machine. Inks will be placed in tiny cups, needles and tubes will be placed in the machine. Either an A&D ointment or a petroleum jelly will be prepared for your use.

 

Now, the time has really come. Are you ready? You should be, because now the artist will start the line-work. Try to relax and take deep breaths. The first line will hurt the most. It will just last about a minute and then you’ll get used to it.

 

Once the line-work is finished, the shading and colouring follows. At this point, the artist may use a different set of magnums or needles which are better for shading, or they may switch machines. Surprisingly for most first timers, the shading and colouring go really fast. You’ll have your tattoo completed in no time.

 

There you have it – the complete process of getting a tattoo! We hope this answers some of the questions of those of you who want to get inked. If you want to know more, contact us and we will be happy to answer your queries!

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